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Category Archives: Social Studies

Lorax~ Excellent Environmental Story for Kids or use in classroom


Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (2012)

PG  86 min  –  Animation | Family | Fantasy  –  2 March 2012 (Canada)
6.5
Your rating:

  -/10
Ratings: 6.5/10 from 442 users   Metascore: 51/100
Reviews: 7 user | 34 critic | 20 from Metacritic.com

A 12-year-old boy searches for the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To find it he must discover the story of the Lorax, the grumpy yet charming creature who fights to protect his world.

 

 

Directors: Chris RenaudKyle Balda

Writers: Ken Daurio (screenplay), Dr. Seuss (book), and 1 more credit »

Click here to read more…

…Universal’s 3D feature film adaption of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax is actually the second time the beloved writer’s story has been brought to the screen – the first time being an animated short that premiered on TV back in 1972. In that 40-year span between Lorax adaptations, the issue of environmental preservation has continued to rage, and so the tale is (unfortunately) as relevant today as it was decades ago.

 But is a 3D movie rife with musical numbers, slapstick comedy and a “hip” modern edge really the best delivery system for a message to kids about environmental responsibility? Or is the presentation of the message at odds with the message itself?…Click here to continue reading the Review…

 

 

Digital Technology helps save Language


Digital technologies are the new life-savers for languages on the verge of extinction, linguists said Friday as they announced eight new dictionaries at a major science conference in Vancouver.
“We’re turning the digital divide into a digital opportunity,” said David Harrison, a National Geographic Fellow at Swarthmore College near Philadelphia.
More than half of some 7,000 languages alive today were considered on the verge of extinction within a century, “threatened by cultural changes, ethnic shame, government repression and other factors,” the scientists said in a paper.
But use of technologies, even by peoples without written languages, “is a heartening trend,” said Harrison. “Language extinction is not an inevitability.”…click here to read more

 

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Gathering Today for Our Aboriginal Children’s Future


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The second Gathering Today For Our Aboriginal Children’s Future, held on November 30th 2010, provided another opportunity for Chairs of Delegated First Nation Agencies (DFNA), Representatives of First Nations served by Child and Family Services Authorities (CFSA), and Co-Chairs of CFSAs to come together as a governance group to discuss issues concerning Aboriginal children and youth in care, and their families.

The Honourable Yvonne Fritz, Minister of Children and Youth Services, hosted the November 30th 2010 governance meeting. The purpose of this meeting was to report on progress made on each of the Next Steps indicated in the Report of the inaugural meeting, and to provide another opportunity for the governors to strengthen the relationship between DFNAs and CFSAs.

One of the items committed to at the inaugural gathering was the development of a tripartite Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Provincial Government, Alberta First Nations and the Federal Government. The Deputy Minister, Steve MacDonald, reported that there have been several meetings with DFNA and CFSA technicians, and Representatives from Treaty 6, 7 and 8 Treaty Organizations to identify the steps to be taken, the best way to proceed, and the issues to be addressed. The Deputy Minister hoped that a business case and an invitation to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) to be at the table would be ready for review and approval before Christmas. He also pointed out that there is a strong interest in having the MOU drafted before the end of this fiscal year, that is, by March 31st 2011….click to read more

 

Canada Fails Aboriginals in Education but supports other countries


…one of the students, a smart and popular boy from a reserve in northern B.C., dropped out this fall, it was an eye-opener for Pearson’s director, David Hawley. While the school provides special support for students from war-torn countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq, it never occurred to him that students from Canada, home to one of the world’s top-ranked education systems, would need the same consideration. He and his staff are now investigating whether they can provide first nations students with the same supports they provide international refugees…

http://m.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/aboriginal-struggles-at-elite-school-reveal-stark-realities-in-canadian-education/article2335007/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=Referrer%3A+Social+Network+%2F+Media&utm_content=2335007&utm_campaign=Shared+Web+Article+Links&service=mobile

 

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Recommended Read: How to Keep Your Language Alive


How to Keep Your Language Alive: A Commonsense Approach to One-On-One Language Learning (Paperback)
Leanne Hinton

New speakers for endangered languages

Amid worldwide accounts of dying languages, author Leanne Hinton and a group of dedicated language activists are doing something about it: they have created a master-apprentice language program, a one-on-one approach that has been remarkably successful in ensuring new speakers will take the place of those, often elderly, who are fluent in an endangered language.

How to Keep Your Language Alive is a manual for students of all languages, from Yurok to Yiddish, Washoe to Welsh; complete with exercises that can–can and should–be done in the most ordinary of settings, written with great simplicity and directness by a member of the linguistics faculty at the University of California, Berkeley.

Amazon: http://www.amazon.ca/Keep-Your-Language-Alive-One/dp/1890771422

 

 

Kid’s Book Review: Wishes and Worries


Here’s a book recommended by an Elder and Educator from my home community of Saddle Lake Cree Nation. This is an excellent resource.  Sometimes these are hard issues to address but necessary.  If anything, let’s a child know they are not alone.

Wishes and Worries

Wishes and Worries. Coping With a Parent Who Drinks Too Much Alcohol
Tundra Books
age 5-8
Written by Centre For Addiction And Mental Health, Illustrated by Lars Rudebjer
32 pages

Synopsis from Tundra Books:

Children of parents who drink too much alcohol are affected in many ways. They may experience anger, fear, confusion, and guilt. This reassuring book, written by professionals, offers information in the form of a story about one family’s struggle. When Dad’s drinking ruins a birthday party, everyone wishes that he would just stop. If only wishing could fix the problem… (click book review link below to read more)

Book Review: http://www.everythingmom.com/kids-books/kids-book-review-wishes-and-worries.html

Buy at Amazon:http://tinyurl.com/74mxbt3

 

Blind Spot uncovered


“How can you be a father if you haven’t had a father?”

This seemingly innocuous question becomes more intriguing upon reflection and CBC reporter/producer Geoff Leo is hoping a documentary shot in Regina will shine a spotlight on a subject that has been hidden in plain sight for decades.

Blind Spot: What Happened To Canada’s Aboriginal Fathers? not only puts the issue of absent aboriginal fathers under a microscope but also attempts to explain the causes of the crisis, the possible solutions and why the issue has never been addressed nationally…. more:http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Blind+Spot+uncovered/5976856/story.html#ixzz1jV7a6pYN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check it out HERE >>> Blind Spot uncovered.

 

BLIND SPOT – What Happened to Canada’s Aboriginal Fathers?

BlindSpot_R1 thumb.jpgJoin us for a free documentary screening of BLIND SPOT: What Happened to Canada’s Aboriginal Fathers?
Blind Spot is a one-hour television documentary filmed in North Central Regina by Geoff Leo of CBC Saskatchewan. The documentary sheds light on the largely unknown and unstudied issue of fatherlessness in Aboriginal communities–the BLIND SPOT. It follows three First Nations men as they face their own personal demons on their quest to become better fathers–even if the odds are against them. 

Thursday, January 12
Albert Scott Community Centre – 1264 Athol Street
Doors Open – 6:00 pm (free chili and bannock)
Screening – 7:00 to 8:00 pm
Followed by a discussion led by Geoff Leo, CBC Saskatchewan and Nick Helliwell, Healing Heart Ministries Men’s Group.
Click here to watch the trailer http://youtu.be/MgGxaJhtcOw
 
 
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